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These next few posts will deal with various DIY projects I’m doing to add the perfect touches to our Narnia decor.

First is to spruce up an antique French “hand” door knocker.
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While on an exterior door of our former house, the brass accents got dull and got a few swipes of white paint from a careless paintbrush.

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I used fine steel wool to gently remove the paint and to bring out the highlights while leaving the dark, antique patina untouched in the recessed areas.  Now The Hand is ready to hang on the Cair Paravel side of the bathroom door–a fancy way to teach kids to knock before entering!

These two lion head door knockers will go in The Lodge as a towel hanger on the door and another beside the sink.  (I bought the rusty ones because they were half the price of the weathered bronze ones which still wouldn’t have been the right color.)  I love these lions, but not what their rusty finish would do to my towels!  All the other hardware in The Lodge is oil-rubbed bronze, so . . .

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First I went over the lions with fine steel wool to remove any loose rusty finish.  Then I bought a can of Rustoleum Oil-Rubbed Bronze spray paint.

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I stuck the bolts in the holes of an upside-down clementine box to spray them.  Neat, huh?

DSC_5446I flipped the rings up onto the lions’ faces and sprayed a light coat from all sides, then let it dry.

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Here’s the job halfway done.  When the paint was dry, I flipped the rings down and sprayed lightly from all angles, making sure not to miss the sides near the paper.

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Here are the finished bolts and one lion.  There are tiny sparkly, coppery particles in this paint so that it catches the light and truly looks like oil-rubbed bronze.

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Here’s a final look at the lions in different light.  This photo doesn’t do justice to their warm bronze patina.  I think they look amazing!

The final adaptation will be to mount one on the wall beside the sink.  Stuart says he can drill holes through one lion so it can be screwed into the wall.  The one to be mounted on the door won’t need any adaptation as the hardware that comes with them includes bolts with those antique-looking nuts to screw in on the opposite side of the door.

One project down!

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